Category Archives: Art

Tips for Painting on Canvas

1. Get Your Canvas Ready

First of all, you should go for a pre-stretched canvas or just stretch the one you already have. Your next step is to prime it. Oftentimes, you can use gesso for this purpose. This is available in a lot of types and can be used with oil paint, tempera, or acrylic, just to name a few.

Gesso protects the canvas fibers and improves the painting surface. As a result, you will have to use less amount of paint for the work you want to do. Using the oil sparingly will save you a good deal of money.

2. Set The Mood

Aside from gesso, another great option is to apply a certain tone to the canvas for setting a mood. For example, a sharp white canvas may not be the right choice for a stormy painting. On the other hand, a simple coat of bluish-gray may offer a moody surface for your desired look, which is what you want.

3. Canvas And Supplies

You should decide on the workplace first. The canvas can be upright or it can be placed on a flat surface near your palette. All you have to do is make your work a lot easier by making the right choice. You may want to get you painting supplies ready. The things you will need include water, palette knives, and paint brushes, just to name a few.

4. Choose The Right Brushes

Some brushes work better for canvas painting. For example, you can’t use water color brushes on hard canvas surfaces. These brushes are too soft and can’t be used on rocks and other hard surfaces. Generally, oil paint brushes or acrylic brushes are a better choice. They come with stiffer bristles and longer handles.

5. Try AN Underpainting

Typically, canvas is used for non-transparent paints. However, they also offer a great opportunity for you to try an underpainting. As a matter of fact, this allows you to create an outline that can add an impressive dept to the art piece. Therefore, it is highly recommended that you try an underpainting as well.

6. Adjust Colors

Usually, oil paints look the same when dry, but acrylic paints look slightly different as soon as they dry out. All you have to do is adjust the colors properly so that the end product is not different. For this, we suggest that you paint a small area of the canvas and let it try to see the results.

Online Art Galleries in India

Rajasthan and other places, mosques and palaces of royalties in different states and so on. It is natural that online art galleries in India enjoy a wide patronage from art enthusiasts and buyers. As an art lover interested in buying from online Indian art galleries, you must follow these tips.

Comb through the gallery with care

Many galleries are big enough in size, and you can find plenty of art objects on display. It is a good idea to go through the catalog in as much detail as possible. It is not a good idea to buy from the first set of paintings that you can find. Invest some more time, explore a little more and check the gallery items as much as you are able to. You may find a better painting on display, and go for it.

Compare the prices

It is essential to have a fair about the pricing of art objects, such as paintings, when you are considering buying any of them from one of the online art galleries in India. Check whether total cost, including the shipping expenses, can be afforded from your end. A little price comparison across different stores can go a long way in finding out more affordable sources online.

Check whether there is a sound return policy

Make sure that the online art gallery you are purchasing from has a proper return policy. There should be some type of satisfaction guarantee or return policy. Keep in mind that you will be buying the art without personally seeing it, and some type of guarantee has to be there. In case you find the art object defective or unsuitable for you in some other way, a return policy will allow you to get it shipped back. Make sure that the artwork comes with shipping insurance; otherwise you will be the one to pay for any damages occurred while shipping.

Register with the gallery

When you like what a gallery has on offer, get listed with it in order to get emails containing information about upcoming events. You can get previews of the work of different artists through email updates and take a look at them when you are relaxing. For reference purposes, you can also get a complete record of previous paintings and exhibitions mailed to you. You can surf these during leisure hours. Keep in mind that online galleries are open 24/7.

Interpret a Painting

Notice the feelings you get looking at the painting, the general impression produced by the entire painting and its elements – later you will dig deeper to understand what inspired those emotions. There is a reason why you like one painting more than the other. Your taste in art is as unique as your taste in food or clothes, inspired by your background, upbringing and even professional expertise.

THE BACKROUND

Collect information on the artist and the historical background. To analyze “Guernica” by Picasso, you need to know that Guernica is a town demolished by the Nazi, and you have to read up on the essential features of cubism. To interpret the image of kissing people covered by a piece of cloth in Magritt’s “The Lovers”, whatever you guess by looking at the painting falls flat once you know that the artist’s mother got drowned in the river, and when found, a piece of cloth was wrapped around her head. So, don’t rely on your skills and taste too much, there are things you need to KNOW before you start making assumptions.

The historical background of the paintings itself is important. Was the artist an innovator, did he start a new trend or movement, whose steps did he/she follow? What experiments was he involved with? How was the painting perceived by the contemporaries? Claude Monet started impressionism with the painting “Sunrise. Impressions”. Malevych started suprematism as a development on abstractionism, laying out the new artistic theory of the color, the form and the composition of the painting. The rough lines and raw colors in the fauvist paintings may be traced back to Van Gogh. Do you think there is something new suggested in the painting you are looking at, or is there anything at all distinguishing about it?

THE STYLE / MOVEMENT

The fastest way to interpret a painting is to determine what movement it belongs to, or at least what movements and styles influenced the artist. The style influences the choice and treatment of the subject, the color, the perspective and the symbols.

Impressionists, for instance, experimented with unusual perspectives – bird’s eye or frog’s eye; their brushwork is visible and the colors are laid separately to mix in the eye of the viewer rather than on the palette. In impressionism the light is more important than the people it bounces off – quite different from romanticism.

In romanticism you have to be a poet, a revolutionary, a gypsy or a vagabond to make your way into the painting – they appreciated the bold spirit, the freedom and the people who were different.

Primitivist (naive) artists depicted objects in a solid monumental manner, as seen by a child who perceives the world as a whole, without analyzing it and breaking into unnecessary components.

In symbolism you do need to look for the hidden meaning, and it’s absolutely pointless in pop art, op art, art nouveau or hyperrealism. Each style and genre sets forth its requirements, so brush up on the movement the artist belongs to before you proceed.

THE COMPOSITION

Now go back to the subject and your first impressions about the painting. It’s time to analyze how the artist made you feel the way you felt using the artistic means it his/her disposal. The composition is the position and the balance of the objects and figures in the space, the interrelation of their size, coloring, shading etc. How exactly does all that impact your perception? Let’s dig in.

First consider the size of the painting. The more impressive the subject, the higher the emotions it appeals to, the bigger it is. Religious, mythological paintings are often huge – their massive energy makes you shiver. It is pretty understandable with figurative paintings like Rafael’s “The Sistine Madonna”, and more subtle with color field paintings of Mark Rothko. People are often overwhelmed with religious tremor in the presence of his artwork, and the size factors in. Also, the subject often calls for larger canvases – battle scenes need space and cannot be fitted into a smaller painting, while some subjects will get lost unless depicted in a smaller size.

Now take a look at the form of the canvas – you might take it for granted, but it does influence the subconscious feeling you get when enjoying a piece of art. Round and oval canvases produce the impression of serenity and completeness, they are often picked for feminine, soft portraits, like Ingre’s “Turkish bath”. Rectangular paintings – vertical or horizontal – are more complicated. While widely used in landscapes, the horizontal format may serve to diminish the figure portrayed, impose or convey some limits, as you can see in Vrubel’s “Demon”. Vertical format ensures monumentality and steadiness.

Now let’s proceed to analyzing the center of the composition. There is an optical center in the middle – you will notice that the center of the composition, the major element will never be placed there, otherwise the scene will look artificial. The center of the composition will always be the most striking element, and the rest will just serve to make it more expressive. The artist may use various means to achieve this effect – the color contrasts, light and shade effects, size of objects and distance between them. Secondary elements are depicted with less detail and vigor – they have to bring forward the center, not block it.

 

Learners of Drawing

The French call this subject ‘nature morte’ which refers to any subject which an artist composes from a collection of inanimate objects. The reason why the drawing is said to be ‘still’ is that the composed objects, their respective positions and placements remain ‘still’ or intact till the drawing is completed. Some objects composed could last for days, weeks, months and even years. It is termed as ‘life’ because the drawings that result from direct or real observations are life drawings.

In still life drawing, the artist has to pay particular attention to the selection and arrangement of the objects to be drawn. The selected objects should be harmonized to create unison or oneness in the composition. Also, the source of light should be taken note of so that the artist can depict the shades and shadows of the objects as accurately as possible. The design principle called ‘proportion’ is very important in still life drawings. The artist has to know and understand the size relations of all the objects in the composition so that he can depict them on the drawing surface with precision and accuracy.

Before a good still life drawing can be executed, the artist has to efficiently use the senses to grasp every information or detail about the objects composed. The optical sense or sense of touch thus the eyes must be used to view the overall shapes of the composed objects whether is round, angular, regular or irregular. It must also be able to detect the size relations and variations of the objects. Each detail on the objects composed must be detected by the use of the eye. For instance, the eye must be able to know the exact movement and direction of the linear patterns of leaves. The tone or shade of colour of each of the composed items must be ascertained. It’s the colour bright or dull, light or dark, opaque or transparent? The optical sense must be able to furnish the artist with this information. Closer and analytical study of the items must be carried out with the eyes. More importantly is the positions and arrangement of the items to be drawn. This would help the artist to be able to depict the foreshortening, perspective and tones of shades of the object.

Moreover, the sense of touch which is the skin must be used by the artist to detect the textures of the objects to be drawn. The textures can be hard, soft, rough, smooth, porous or non-porous. This would enable the artist to know the kind of shading technique to employ in the rendition of the shades on the objects. The artist to know this must touch and feel the object to be drawn if it’s safe to do so. This would help him to render the shading objectively.

Furthermore, the kinesthetic sense or sense of movement will show whether the object is lighter or heavy in weight, fragile or strong. This will help the artist to know the type of line to use in the drawing of the item(s) as well as the degree of tones and the type of shade to be rendered on the drawn objects

The Foundation of Modern Painting

From the generation and production of the media for production through to the selection of appropriate subjects for paintings, techniques through to its essential roles it plays in the society acts as a stepping stone for the marvelous development in the field of painting today.

In their quest to obtain a permanent and durable coloring medium for painting, the Egyptian painters’ ground ochres into powder and mixed them with gum. The resulting pigments were dissolved as the painters wet the brushes and rubbed them over the surface much as the watercolor paint used today. The application of the paint was done by the use of brushes which were creatively made from the trimmed stems of other marsh plants. Bristles which held a supply of wet pigment were made by chewing one end of their stems to separate the fibers. The supports for the painting included Papyrus paper, wooden panels, stone tablets, walls and surfaces of pyramids and temples. Today, color manufacturers, use binders which are in the likeness of the gum used by the ancient Egyptian painters mixed with pigments in producing colorants in the form of dry media like pastels, crayons and the like as well as wet media like acrylics, gouache, poster and watercolors, emulsion and oil paints and many more. Modern painters have strived to increase the scope of supports for painting while the traditional supports still remain very instrumental.

The theme for the paintings of the Egyptians depicted their belief in life after death and the affluent life of the elite class in the society. The themes included people hunting and feasting, Pharaohs, the affluent and other important people journeying to the land of the dead, people worshipping deities, scenes of musicians and dancers, Judgment in the underworld and familiar scenes from the earthly existence of the deceased. Today, genres of everyday life activities that reflect the ideologies and beliefs of modern societies are the principal theme for painting as was done by the ancient Egyptians.

Moreover, various techniques were used by the ancient Egyptian painters.  The head and legs are in profile with the torso and eyes in frontal view. Men were painted bigger and darker than women and children. Prominent people and noblemen in the communities were painted bigger and darker than slaves. This is a visual representation of the class distinction that existed in Egypt. Distance or depth in drawing (perspective) was depicted by the placement of one body on top of another. Animals and plants in their natural habitats were painted to show naturalism based on careful observation. The technique of their painting was mural painting (fresco secco) that is painting on a dry plaster or surface. This painting technique allowed the trained professional Egyptian painter to express an exact knowledge of the theme or subject painted. Today, the concept of perspective which was the only parallel perspective has been heightened to include aerial perspective with varied forms of linear perspectives like isometric and angular forms of perspective.

In terms of function, the paintings of ancient Egypt were made primarily to serve the dead in the metaphysical world. They provided the ka or soul with familiar scenes from the earthly existence of the deceased. They also showed the royal power of the Pharaohs. For instance, the king depicted on the painted chest is portrayed as a successful hunter pursuing droves of fleeing animals in the desert and also as a great warrior. Most of the paintings showed the nobility, richness, and prosperity of Egypt. Paintings were used to lavishly decorate the interiors and exteriors of private and public buildings to accentuate their aesthetic values.

Abstract Art

First, I guess we should probably break down what abstract art is. Simplistically, abstract art is any creation that doesn’t mimic reality.

When you look at abstract art, it can be confusing at first because you’re not always admiring a tree or a person or an animal; you’re admiring how colors play off each other, how the paint moves across the canvas, and how shapes lines up with one another.

There are abstract artists who move the paint into familiar shape. Sometimes you can pick out a park, or a horse, or a circus elephant. Sometimes, though, the art is just a series of intersecting lines and circles.

The meaning of the art is personal and up to your interpretation. Abstract art requires an audience to be complete.

The ultimate mission of abstract art is to serve as a visual expression of the artist’s emotions and to evoke a response in the viewer. The magic of abstract art is its chameleon ability to give a different experience to everyone who looks at it.

Oil painting is a stand-by for classical and modern artists alike. Its sheen, richness, and elegance make it a top-tier choice in the medium department. When it comes to abstract paintings, however, it might be time to pull out the newcomers to the paint scene: acrylic.

Around only since the 1930s, acrylic paint as an advantage other paints don’t: it dries really, really fast! Oil painting isn’t something you should count out for future paintings, but to start it’s best to work with something that dries quickly so that you can’t question the decisions you’re making. It forces you to commit to your art, which is helpful when learning to go with the flow and create from your soul.

Now that you know what paint you’re using, it’s time to figure out what you’re going to paint on. Abstract art lends itself to a plethora of different painting surfaces, especially when you’re using acrylic paint. Many famous abstract artists – Jackson Pollock, Picasso, Leonid Afremov – do their painting on canvas.

Painting on canvas allows your art is speak for itself. You’re not trying to tie in the shape of a piece of wood or found object: the two dimensional surface gives your colors and shapes the spotlight. When you’re more comfortable using art as an outlet  you can incorporate other “canvases.” Some abstract artists even create their paintings on people’s skin!

Getting exposure for the art works

If these artists aren’t showcasing their creations online or in art exhibitions they won’t be getting the recognition that they deserve for all the time and effort they take in designing and making them.

It’s a real shame that some countries aren’t teaching basic practices on the world-wide-web today for creative minds. I believe a lot of confusion with the world-wide internet could be avoided after schooling years if school curriculums’ covered web development and SEO. So that everyone could be given the same opportunities to create their masterpieces and develop their own online art exhibition to showcase their designs.

These days most artists are so engrossed in their creations they don’t have time to learn how to market their products. They are the creative ones’ that want to pour their time and energy into new and exciting projects, not sit an online course to understand web design and development so that they can create a site themselves and learn how to get it to the top of the search engines for exposure.

My nephew has a girlfriend whose father is a successful artist, who has developed his own site to give his work the exposure it deserves, but he is only one artist that I know of that has done this. Paying community hall fees to showcase your creations can often defeat you, as you have already paid the costs to develop your designs, and generally at the end of that project you want a quick turnaround, to simply pay for the materials and time spent in making it.

Am I right? So how will you be able to further out-lay more money to pay for an exhibition when you haven’t been able to properly marketing the designs and creations you have building up for sale?

Apart from understanding how to use the worldwide web to showcase your art, please consider what the best option for you will be. If you are successful and you have the cash flow to pay for an exhibition, you can gain some more credibility within your niche by hosting this type of event, and being the artist in-house at the event, to answer any questions that potential buyers may have about your creations.

Tips for Drawing

Some find it in nature; some find it deep in the cities; some have the purpose of creating detailed figurative drawings; while some tend to care more about the process of being creative. The one thing that remains the same, though, is that artists are more productive when they know how to find and use inspiration around them.

If you’re up for some creative challenges, here are a few classic favorites:

1. Look at People

There are many ways to use your surroundings to find inspiration. If you are the kind of artist that likes to search for inspiration outdoors, you can go to a park and people watch. You can observe their interactions with one another, or with their kids, or even with their pets; you can observe them in contrast to the environment around them. Then, you can use those people’s experiences as inspiration for your art. You can paint them exactly as you seem them, or you can use what they represent and draw inspiration from the merging of nature with people.

2. Look at the Horizon

If you prefer to observe an environment free of living things, and just focus on landscapes, you can look at the horizon. It makes no difference if it is the one you see when staring at the ocean or the one you see hidden behind skyscrapers in a big city, you can use it as inspiration and you can come up with a few words to describe it. Once you have those words, you can paint what they represent to you, instead of the horizon you derived them from.

3. Look at Your Feet

If you prefer to stay in the comfort of your own home, you can draw your inspiration from random things around the house. One idea is to look at your own feet, and the spaces in between them. You can use those highlights as points, and you can draw a picture by connecting those dots. You can also try to connect the dots on anything else around the house and draw a picture from them, from the shadows the furniture casts on the floor to the different levels of the paintings hanging on the walls.

 

Vector Art is a technique

Vector programs take note of the relationship between these elements. This allows images created to vary their scale without losing quality or pixelating. In comparison, pixels lose quality when they are raised above 100% of their size.

Popular vector programs are Illustrator, Freehand, Corel Draw, and Flash. Almost everything created with these programs is considered as vector work. I say “almost” because there are exceptions to each rule. If your vector work combines vector images with raster images, I’m afraid that it is no longer a vectorial work (and consequently does not belong to the Vector Gallery).

For example: to finish your vectorial work, you think that your work is missing something, and you put it in Photoshop to give it a small texture, trying to complete it more. At that moment it is no longer a vector work, and you should upload it to “Digital art> Mixed Media”. In the same way, if you take the rasterized texture and put it in Illustrator by applying a layer style, nor would it be a vector work.

As this texture cannot be increased by over 100%, it makes your vector technically useless after raster images in original size. Do not even think that you cannot add textures to your vector work. Many of these programs come equipped with samples of detailed patterns, textured brushes, even with “Live Trace”, which as its name indicates, traces raster images and converts them into vector graphics.

Reiterating and ensuring there is no confusion, here is a list with programs generally considered as raster-based: Photoshop, Painter, MS Paint and a great free alternative, Gimp. Basically, everything created with this program is considered rasterized image. A few of these programs are able to create images with points, lines, and curves, just as a vector program would do.

Pop Art Vector Tutorial

1.we will start from a line drawing of the face in close up. This line drawing could be with simple strokes, nothing too complicated.

Next, we’ll create the shadows with objects filled with solid black. Use the Pen Tool (P) to draw the objects and try to give volume and movement to the illustration. Take a special look at how we drew the hair strokes and the shadow under the chin.

2 .Choose the colors you’d like to use in your pop art vector illustrations. I chose the typical colors used in pop art illustrations to make a more obvious effect, but you can choose the colors that better represent your photo (if you made the drawing from a photo) or illustration.

 3 We need the grid guideline to make the dots swatch for every color. Reveal the grid by going to View > Show Grid. Make sure you have “Snap to Grid” enable. Go to View > Snap Grid to check if it’s enabled. If it has a check mark next to it, it’s enabled. If it doesn’t, click to enable.

Draw two circles with the Ellipse Tool (L). Hold the Shift key while drawing the ellipse to constrain the proportions and create the circle. The space between the circles would determine the predominant color in the swatch. The closer the circles are, the more predominant the circle’s color would be the background color. Also, the more space the dots have, the more noticeable they would be to the human eye. In this tutorial, I’d like them to be pretty noticeable.

 4 Now duplicate the two circles and rotate them 90 degrees using the Rotate Tool (R). Click and hold the Shift key to rotate in increments of 45 degrees. Next, draw a square with the Rectangle Tool (M) where each side goes through the circles’ center point.

 5 Duplicate four times each set of square + dots, one for each color that our illustration has. Now fill each set of circles with the colors of our illustration. Finally, fill the square with white. Now we are ready to create the swatches from this elements! Select the first square with the circles inside and go to Edit > Define Pattern. Name your swatch if you’d like, and click OK to create the swatch. Repeat the process for the other colors. You’ll see the new swatches available in the Swatches Panel.

 6 Replace the colors of the objects in our illustration with the new swatches. Select each object and click on the corresponding swatch in the Swatch Panel. Definitely starting to look like a pop art vector!

If you are unhappy with the way any of the swatches look as patterns in your illustration, you can play with the background color to create other tones.

Now we are going to take care of the strokes used to give expression to the face. This is single strokes with no fill. There are some for the nose profile, cheeks, forehead, etc. Open the brushes panel (Window > Brushes) and click on the top right icon to reveal its menu. Select Open Brush Library > Artistic > Artistic_Ink.

A new panel will appear. Now select one of the strokes and click on the bottom brush named “Tapered Stroke” in the panel we just opened. Do the same with the rest of the strokes. I applied the brush to all of my elements in the illustration to have the edges between them perfectly aligned.

8.If the brush for the expression lines is too wide or too thin (depends on the size of your illustration), you can adjust the brush width. Go to the brush panel where you’ll find the brush you use for the expression lines. When you select a brush in any of the brush library panels, it’s added automatically to the main Brush Panel. Double click on the brush and in the Width slider, move the arrow to the left to make the stroke thinner or to the right to make them wider. Click OK when you’re finished