Monthly Archives: August 2017

The Foundation of Modern Painting

From the generation and production of the media for production through to the selection of appropriate subjects for paintings, techniques through to its essential roles it plays in the society acts as a stepping stone for the marvelous development in the field of painting today.

In their quest to obtain a permanent and durable coloring medium for painting, the Egyptian painters’ ground ochres into powder and mixed them with gum. The resulting pigments were dissolved as the painters wet the brushes and rubbed them over the surface much as the watercolor paint used today. The application of the paint was done by the use of brushes which were creatively made from the trimmed stems of other marsh plants. Bristles which held a supply of wet pigment were made by chewing one end of their stems to separate the fibers. The supports for the painting included Papyrus paper, wooden panels, stone tablets, walls and surfaces of pyramids and temples. Today, color manufacturers, use binders which are in the likeness of the gum used by the ancient Egyptian painters mixed with pigments in producing colorants in the form of dry media like pastels, crayons and the like as well as wet media like acrylics, gouache, poster and watercolors, emulsion and oil paints and many more. Modern painters have strived to increase the scope of supports for painting while the traditional supports still remain very instrumental.

The theme for the paintings of the Egyptians depicted their belief in life after death and the affluent life of the elite class in the society. The themes included people hunting and feasting, Pharaohs, the affluent and other important people journeying to the land of the dead, people worshipping deities, scenes of musicians and dancers, Judgment in the underworld and familiar scenes from the earthly existence of the deceased. Today, genres of everyday life activities that reflect the ideologies and beliefs of modern societies are the principal theme for painting as was done by the ancient Egyptians.

Moreover, various techniques were used by the ancient Egyptian painters.  The head and legs are in profile with the torso and eyes in frontal view. Men were painted bigger and darker than women and children. Prominent people and noblemen in the communities were painted bigger and darker than slaves. This is a visual representation of the class distinction that existed in Egypt. Distance or depth in drawing (perspective) was depicted by the placement of one body on top of another. Animals and plants in their natural habitats were painted to show naturalism based on careful observation. The technique of their painting was mural painting (fresco secco) that is painting on a dry plaster or surface. This painting technique allowed the trained professional Egyptian painter to express an exact knowledge of the theme or subject painted. Today, the concept of perspective which was the only parallel perspective has been heightened to include aerial perspective with varied forms of linear perspectives like isometric and angular forms of perspective.

In terms of function, the paintings of ancient Egypt were made primarily to serve the dead in the metaphysical world. They provided the ka or soul with familiar scenes from the earthly existence of the deceased. They also showed the royal power of the Pharaohs. For instance, the king depicted on the painted chest is portrayed as a successful hunter pursuing droves of fleeing animals in the desert and also as a great warrior. Most of the paintings showed the nobility, richness, and prosperity of Egypt. Paintings were used to lavishly decorate the interiors and exteriors of private and public buildings to accentuate their aesthetic values.

Abstract Art

First, I guess we should probably break down what abstract art is. Simplistically, abstract art is any creation that doesn’t mimic reality.

When you look at abstract art, it can be confusing at first because you’re not always admiring a tree or a person or an animal; you’re admiring how colors play off each other, how the paint moves across the canvas, and how shapes lines up with one another.

There are abstract artists who move the paint into familiar shape. Sometimes you can pick out a park, or a horse, or a circus elephant. Sometimes, though, the art is just a series of intersecting lines and circles.

The meaning of the art is personal and up to your interpretation. Abstract art requires an audience to be complete.

The ultimate mission of abstract art is to serve as a visual expression of the artist’s emotions and to evoke a response in the viewer. The magic of abstract art is its chameleon ability to give a different experience to everyone who looks at it.

Oil painting is a stand-by for classical and modern artists alike. Its sheen, richness, and elegance make it a top-tier choice in the medium department. When it comes to abstract paintings, however, it might be time to pull out the newcomers to the paint scene: acrylic.

Around only since the 1930s, acrylic paint as an advantage other paints don’t: it dries really, really fast! Oil painting isn’t something you should count out for future paintings, but to start it’s best to work with something that dries quickly so that you can’t question the decisions you’re making. It forces you to commit to your art, which is helpful when learning to go with the flow and create from your soul.

Now that you know what paint you’re using, it’s time to figure out what you’re going to paint on. Abstract art lends itself to a plethora of different painting surfaces, especially when you’re using acrylic paint. Many famous abstract artists – Jackson Pollock, Picasso, Leonid Afremov – do their painting on canvas.

Painting on canvas allows your art is speak for itself. You’re not trying to tie in the shape of a piece of wood or found object: the two dimensional surface gives your colors and shapes the spotlight. When you’re more comfortable using art as an outlet  you can incorporate other “canvases.” Some abstract artists even create their paintings on people’s skin!

Getting exposure for the art works

If these artists aren’t showcasing their creations online or in art exhibitions they won’t be getting the recognition that they deserve for all the time and effort they take in designing and making them.

It’s a real shame that some countries aren’t teaching basic practices on the world-wide-web today for creative minds. I believe a lot of confusion with the world-wide internet could be avoided after schooling years if school curriculums’ covered web development and SEO. So that everyone could be given the same opportunities to create their masterpieces and develop their own online art exhibition to showcase their designs.

These days most artists are so engrossed in their creations they don’t have time to learn how to market their products. They are the creative ones’ that want to pour their time and energy into new and exciting projects, not sit an online course to understand web design and development so that they can create a site themselves and learn how to get it to the top of the search engines for exposure.

My nephew has a girlfriend whose father is a successful artist, who has developed his own site to give his work the exposure it deserves, but he is only one artist that I know of that has done this. Paying community hall fees to showcase your creations can often defeat you, as you have already paid the costs to develop your designs, and generally at the end of that project you want a quick turnaround, to simply pay for the materials and time spent in making it.

Am I right? So how will you be able to further out-lay more money to pay for an exhibition when you haven’t been able to properly marketing the designs and creations you have building up for sale?

Apart from understanding how to use the worldwide web to showcase your art, please consider what the best option for you will be. If you are successful and you have the cash flow to pay for an exhibition, you can gain some more credibility within your niche by hosting this type of event, and being the artist in-house at the event, to answer any questions that potential buyers may have about your creations.

Tips for Drawing

Some find it in nature; some find it deep in the cities; some have the purpose of creating detailed figurative drawings; while some tend to care more about the process of being creative. The one thing that remains the same, though, is that artists are more productive when they know how to find and use inspiration around them.

If you’re up for some creative challenges, here are a few classic favorites:

1. Look at People

There are many ways to use your surroundings to find inspiration. If you are the kind of artist that likes to search for inspiration outdoors, you can go to a park and people watch. You can observe their interactions with one another, or with their kids, or even with their pets; you can observe them in contrast to the environment around them. Then, you can use those people’s experiences as inspiration for your art. You can paint them exactly as you seem them, or you can use what they represent and draw inspiration from the merging of nature with people.

2. Look at the Horizon

If you prefer to observe an environment free of living things, and just focus on landscapes, you can look at the horizon. It makes no difference if it is the one you see when staring at the ocean or the one you see hidden behind skyscrapers in a big city, you can use it as inspiration and you can come up with a few words to describe it. Once you have those words, you can paint what they represent to you, instead of the horizon you derived them from.

3. Look at Your Feet

If you prefer to stay in the comfort of your own home, you can draw your inspiration from random things around the house. One idea is to look at your own feet, and the spaces in between them. You can use those highlights as points, and you can draw a picture by connecting those dots. You can also try to connect the dots on anything else around the house and draw a picture from them, from the shadows the furniture casts on the floor to the different levels of the paintings hanging on the walls.

 

Vector Art is a technique

Vector programs take note of the relationship between these elements. This allows images created to vary their scale without losing quality or pixelating. In comparison, pixels lose quality when they are raised above 100% of their size.

Popular vector programs are Illustrator, Freehand, Corel Draw, and Flash. Almost everything created with these programs is considered as vector work. I say “almost” because there are exceptions to each rule. If your vector work combines vector images with raster images, I’m afraid that it is no longer a vectorial work (and consequently does not belong to the Vector Gallery).

For example: to finish your vectorial work, you think that your work is missing something, and you put it in Photoshop to give it a small texture, trying to complete it more. At that moment it is no longer a vector work, and you should upload it to “Digital art> Mixed Media”. In the same way, if you take the rasterized texture and put it in Illustrator by applying a layer style, nor would it be a vector work.

As this texture cannot be increased by over 100%, it makes your vector technically useless after raster images in original size. Do not even think that you cannot add textures to your vector work. Many of these programs come equipped with samples of detailed patterns, textured brushes, even with “Live Trace”, which as its name indicates, traces raster images and converts them into vector graphics.

Reiterating and ensuring there is no confusion, here is a list with programs generally considered as raster-based: Photoshop, Painter, MS Paint and a great free alternative, Gimp. Basically, everything created with this program is considered rasterized image. A few of these programs are able to create images with points, lines, and curves, just as a vector program would do.